Tuesday, July 20, 2010

How to enter the "big epsilon" in LaTeX

There are two kinds of epsilons in LaTeX, \(\epsilon\) and \(\varepsilon\), which can be entered as "\epsilon" and "\varepsilon" respectively. So how about the "big epsilon" \(\mathcal{E}\) which occurs often as the symbol for "energy functional"? It turns out, it's not an epsilon, but a curved letter "E". To enter it in LaTeX, simply do "\mathcal{E}".

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks!

Unknown said...

Somehow it turns out I needed that and I found it here. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Just Googled for "big epsilon latex" and found it here! Thank you:)

Anonymous said...

me too ;-)

cannon said...

Google takes me here. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

thanks for this :)

Anonymous said...

Thank u!

Anonymous said...

I just googled big epsilon latex as everyone else. Thanks !

Anonymous said...

Thanks, i am thinking big epsilon too !

Anonymous said...

That's a Roman E in script, not a 'big epsilon'. A capital epsilon is indistinguishable from an E, and presumably you'd want it to appear in the same font family as your other Greek letters.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much! I don't care where it comes from, I'm no linguist! That's the character I need.

Anonymous said...

Many thanks for this. Irrespective of what it is typographically it is a better version of the symbol for electric field.

Anonymous said...

thanks alot! searched in every greek letter latex pdf i could find and found my answer here :)

Anonymous said...

Thanks a lot ....

Calum Black said...

Thank you!

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